Reality is Sugar Free

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Some of my doctors are better than others at providing a clear view of reality, while others offer the sugar coated version. Some are extremely confident while others provide wiggle and waffle room. I would, sociologically speaking, find it fascinating if it wasn’t my future we were discussing.

I visited one of the top spine rehab neurologists in the country yesterday. I’m glad I didn’t get my hopes up before the visit, but I am also glad I went so this can be settled once and for all.

His phrasing refreshingly sugar free, so I am going to provide a  summary of our discussion here.

Dr: What is it that you think I can help you with today? What brings you here?
Me: Well, I haven’t seen a neurologist for my spine since I was a child, after the initial injury occurred, and based on a recommendation from my physical therapist I wanted an evaluation of current status and what I might expect for healing, and if you could do anything for the other bothersome symptoms I have like stomach issues, bowel/bladder, leg twitches while sleeping, balance trouble, leg weakness, things like that. And I wanted to see if you had any information on how this might effect vestibular function or migraines. (I think I rambled on a bit actually but that was basically what I tried to say)

He gave me a good long stare.

Dr: I have reviewed your charts. I see your xray here (points to screen) and this is not a healthy spine, I would be amazed if you didn’t have balance issues and leg twitches. I saw your vestibular testing, some of that was rediculous to give to you, you have impartial messages going through half your body, of course your brain is confused by that, that doesn’t indicate malfunction, that indicates adaptation to so many years of your central nervous system doing its best.

He then did a standard neuro exam – watched me walk up and down a very long hallway, hit reflex points in knees, feet, ankles, arms with his rubber hammer, had me try to push against his hands in various positions to check strength. He noted the weakness, abnormal reflexes, difference in size and temperature of my legs.

He made that face they always do when they confirm spinal nerve damage. Even when they know, they don’t like to see it. I don’t like it either.

He seems like he wants to dismiss me, and I almost panic, this can’t be it, I waited 4 months to see him, drove 2 hours, and walked 20 min, waited an hour past my time. I was getting my questions answered.

Me: Would it be worthwhile at this point to do any testing to evaluate the nerve health, like EMG or anything else to see how the nerves are functioning now? Either to help with physical therapy or provide information as to the extent of the damage? Give me realistic expectations?

Dr: No. It would not be useful. We use those tests as pass/fail, the numbers are irrelevant for treatment. You have already failed without further testing, you have signs of severe nerve damage. If we tested you, your numbers may come out high or low, but they will come out as abnormal, which we already know, so its a waste of time and money.

Me: Oh. I see. So I was once told that I might expect some healing every 10 years or so, the rate of nerve growth. Is that still true based on recent medicine?

Dr: Only the Good God knows if you may expect some healing, but some doctors do say some stupid things, don’t they? This type of damage is not known to be reversible and at some point it may be time to stop seeing doctors and get on and live your life as you can.

I had to blink that back, totally was not expecting that response.

Me: Okay… but what about some of the other secondary symptoms. I’d really like to sleep better. Anything to help my legs stop moving and twitching? Or to keep my stomach moving along to prevent the heartburn and constipation? Or to give me better sensation to know when it is time to use the bathroom instead of watching the clock?

Dr: We don’t have any magic pills for you. Again, with the damage and curve still left in in your spine I would expect some considerable irritation and twitching. You should ask a GI about those other issues. What I will do for you is contact your vestibular therapist and add some exercises to your plan that will help with balance, make you more confident, and reduce falls. I’m also referring you to a vestibular neurologist. There’s nothing more we can do for your spine. You should know it is very strong now, between the fusion and the hardware, your spine itself is quite safe and protected within its armor. You could still pull a muscle, but there is nothing you could do to hurt your spine, even drive a truck over it. hehehe

He recommended Otago and Tinetti exercises. I looked them up and found that they are mostly for older adults fall prevention. Hmm. Seems like my CNS has aged prematurely. Here is info on Otago and here is some on Tinetti exercises, each has a pdf to download and youtube of course has many videos too.

So I guess I appreciated his attempt to give me confidence and lighten the mood. I believed him, every word. My spine is solid. The damage has not changed much since I was 12, I don’t really expect it to change much, better or worse, so I guess I can accept that. It isn’t something that needs monitored. OK. I am fine with one less doctor, really I am.

And I agree that I don’t need any more painful, expensive tests to prove what we already know. Fine. Move on.

Somewhere I was maybe hoping for some radical new treatment, something cool with stem cells, or a brand new medicine that speeds up nerve transmission, or something that filters out these random twitches, an implant, an electrode…but no such luck. Its ok. I’m ok. I’m glad I asked.

 

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4 thoughts on “Reality is Sugar Free

  1. Yes, it’s good to know. It’s also disappointing to know. My pain specialist thought he wanted to send me for spine surgery, after he saw my MRI. However, he saw the MRI the same day he was giving me an epidural. I thought he only wanted the report; he wanted the MRI, so I brought it to the epidural. Two weeks later, he did a follow up, and he discovered, to his horror, I remembered everything. His advice: Wait until you can no longer tolerate the pain and can’t move. Hopefully, by then, we’ll have developed new therapy that will keep you from needing surgery. I do my physical therapy, created to build core strength, 5-6 days a week. Doesn’t help the messed up ankles. Maddening. I hope your new exercises really help.

    • Yes I’ve gotten that type of pain management advice too. We have to wait for it to get worse before treatment is given because it can cause other issues and is last resort when you can no longer move. And yes it’s difficult to balance multiple issues, this exercise helps my back but hurts my knees. We do what we can somehow. It is maddening, good word

  2. No is an answer you can work with. Acceptance is a process. Exercises that help with balance are good. I’ll look them up since I am working on this issue. Thanks for sharing the links.

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